Lore by Alexandra Bracken

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts are my own.

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality. Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

Good to know:

  • TW: sexual assault, gore, violence
  • (Probably) a standalone
  • YA urban fantasy
  • 450 pages

Hey everyone, I hope you’ve been staying safe and keeping busy! I know the past few months have given me the chance to read a lot of the books I’ve been eyeing, and I was super excited to receive an arc of this one.

Lore follows the story of Melora Perseus, the last of the descendants of the hero Perseus (I recommend reading the synopsis above, it’s a bit hard to explain the premise). It’s filled to the brim with fight scenes, romance, and good old Greek god drama. It is definitely a unique take that I was excited to jump into–I went in with expectations of something in the vein of Percy Jackson.

Unfortunately, Lore was written with the same simplistic style of Percy Jackson without the lovable characters or gripping plot. From the start, I was quite disappointed by the way things progressed; it followed the formula of a typical YA–all action, no substance. The story moved at a non-stop pace, but I was never brought to the edge of my seat and it was almost a chore to keep reading. The writing lacked subtlety and the “plot twists”, while somewhat unexpected, felt inconsequential.

I never felt connected to the characters or invested in their story. I feel like Bracken tried to create an anti-hero complex within Lore, but it was shallow and a bit confusing. Lore and the lover boy had zero chemistry and the friendships were absolutely lackluster. The side characters were basically cardboard and the antagonists are out-villained by Doctor Doofenshmirtz. There were violent scenes that were horrible to read and didn’t contribute much beyond shock factor.

I feel like I don’t have much beyond complaints for this one. It was a long book that I didn’t enjoy very much. I can’t tell if it’s because I’ve outgrown YA or because this one was particularly bad. Based on my past experiences with Alexandra Bracken (which weren’t great), I’m hoping it’s the latter.

If you’re looking for Greek-mythology inspired books, I recommend Circe or Song of Achilles.

Rise of the Twinkling Heir Promotion

ROTH Book Cover.jpgHey everyone 🙂

I just wanted to share a quick look at Rise of the Twinkling Heir by O.C. Jaime. This is the first book of a new YA fantasy series featuring a classic coming-of-age story.

Hermium Everling never wanted to be an Imaginent, and he never wanted to be a redhead either, but such was his lot.  He was the boy that built things in his sleep.  
 
All he wanted was normal, like every other thirteen-year-old living on the North Star who had aspirations about getting into his favorite Thunder.  Thunder cadets were cool!  And those who got into Glimmeroc were the coolest of all! 
 
The odds of that happening for Hermium however would take an act of the Gods, and an act of the Gods is precisely what is needed.  
 
For a great evil now threatens Hermium’s world.  Folk are disappearing.  The talk of spectrals and fangists spreads.  Even the heavens have been touched by what now festers in secret.  There is but one answer: the Gods must seal Hermium to his purpose, and it must be Glimmeroc, and it must be quick. 
 
Because Molderaac stirs, growing signs are everywhere, and with him the Darkening.  And only a light of creation can defeat another light, and only an Imaginent can hold that light’s key.  
 
Of course, Hermium doesn’t know that yet, but he will…
After reading the preface to this book, I can say that I’m really looking forward to it. The author is going to be self-published, so any help in launching this book would be fantastic. If you would like to pledge and receive a copy of the e-book, click here.
There has been a tremendous amount of heart put into the creation of this book and development of its world, as seen in the numerous trailers and teasers made to promote it. You can find those on Jaime’s website.

Also, soon to come is a review for The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang. I’ll link it as soon as it’s up.

Artboard 2@300x-100

The Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith

The Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith

Image result for the way i used to be smith

  • My rating: 3.9/5 stars (petty, but I don’t want to give it 4 full stars lol)
  • Published by Margaret K. McElderry Books
  • 385 pages
  • Goodreads
  • Amazon
  • TW: rape, sexual assault

Eden was always good at being good. Starting high school didn’t change who she was. But the night her brother’s best friend rapes her, Eden’s world capsizes.

What was once simple, is now complex. What Eden once loved—who she once loved—she now hates. What she thought she knew to be true, is now lies. Nothing makes sense anymore, and she knows she’s supposed to tell someone what happened but she can’t. So she buries it instead. And she buries the way she used to be.

Told in four parts—freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior year—this provocative debut reveals the deep cuts of trauma. But it also demonstrates one young woman’s strength as she navigates the disappointment and unbearable pains of adolescence, of first love and first heartbreak, of friendships broken and rebuilt, and while learning to embrace a power of survival she never knew she had hidden within her heart.

Read my spoiler-free review and discussion below.

Continue reading “The Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith”